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Tag: History

Regional Aggressor or Regional Scapegoat?

Is it just semantics or just misrepresentation?

Eritrea is often labeled by journalists and governments as a regional aggressor (here1 and here2). The most often cited evidence for this designation is that Eritrea has been engaged in conflict with each of its contiguous neighbors as well as an overseas state. Ironically however, its neighbor to the south, Ethiopia has had border conflicts with four of its six neighbors, has occupied two of them in the past two decades and has actively fomented insurgencies in its neighbors. Superficially they both seem to be aggressive nations but as we know, nothing is as simple as it seems.


  1. Eritrea: The Siege State 

  2. Ethiopia rebels say capture base, kill 94 soldiers 

Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Why can’t we all just get along? Specifically, why is it that Eritrea and Ethiopia cannot get along? After all it would seem to the casual observer that Eritreans and Ethiopians are roughly similar. They share similar GDP’s per capita, religious balances, and are even geographically connected by a 1,000 km boundary. Some even go so far as to say they share history! Well this isn’t entirely honest.

Theft, Development and Being a Good Samaritan

In a book praised by the likes of nobelaureate Joseph Stiglitz and Noam Chomsky, Ha-Joon Chang’s Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism briefly discusses the economic history of today’s great powers and charts possible ways forward for less developed countries. Ha-Joon addresses the mystery of economic development by the Asian Tigers as well as how countries such as the United States and Germany developed.

Questions of Eritrean History

I thought today I would take the time to respond to some comments from another blog that I happened upon. The post that I had commented on was about Eritrea and Ethiopia’s less than neighborly relations for the past decade. I thought that part of the original post were ill-informed, as were some of the comments, however, because I believe in not being too judgmental, engage in the conversation. Impressively the original author responded to my comments with more depth than I expected (a wonderful surprise), however, I disagreed further with his statements. Careful not to start a blogging war I decided it would be best to create a far more in depth post here because the information will hopefully be instructive to a much larger audience.

Monuments to Famed Eritrean-Russian Author

The development of cultural awareness is a critical component of nation-building. It helps to create a more cohesive society by acting as a binding agent, acting against the stresses from without. In Eritrea this is a particularly important component to nation-building as the memory of the brutality of colonial subjugation is waning as the current generation has little memory of it.

To this end it is similarly important, if not a symbiotic result, to delve deeper into our history and document it. As research into the Eritrean history and its interaction with its neighbors develops we are bound to find surprising relationships. To this end, the evidence seems to point to the famed Russian author Alexander Pushkin, to be part Eritrean.